What are the basic requirements for a community garden?

almost 6 years ago
CLOSED: This map consultation has concluded

Every community garden will vary, depending upon the site and the community who work in it. The site will have a micro-climate that needs to be understood and managed. The very basic considerations for the site include the slope, solar access and water. The gardeners will have choices about the way they want to garden and when. The formation and growth of the community group is as important as the planting. Like every living thing, community gardens and the groups that work them, evolve over time.

  • The Deacon about 9 years ago
    So typical of these usless BMCC forums presented in such a one eyed fashion, the way you are presenting this is not a forum its a done deal & who ever it is at BMCC that feels this is such a great idea why dont you make sure you situate it right at your own front door. WHERE DO YOU INTEND TO LOCATE THESE GARDENS ???????WHY ARE BMCC intending to waste huge amounts of all rate payers money ??Who is fronting the cost of solar panels runing water to garden locations and remember if BMCC places a single park bench on site there goes another $8000, yes that is BMCC cost on a park bench.GET out of debt BMCC or use this money on worth while needs in the community their is so much to be doneRemember this BMCC you work for the whole community the community are not your underlings.
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    • DOG GONE about 9 years ago
      no dogs I find u here as well and RIGHT U R on all counts.No dogs I feel the community that wants a garden must raise their own funds at least that is how I read it.But still if half dozen or so ppl want a patch and they are granted community land wher will this land be in each community in a parkland on a foot path edge of national park just where this has not been made clear by BMCC.BEST place is in your own back yard, their is no community with out family.
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      • NKresident almost 9 years ago
        Not everyone has a family. Communities are built by people who CARE about each other's welfare - whether related or not. If you read Council's policy & guidelines they make it very clear that Council is NOT responsible for establishing and maintaining the gardens. Only a well-organised group would be able to meet Council's requirements and it is up to the group to identify what land might be suitable - and to then persuade Council of its merits as a community garden (as opposed to some other use of the land). The group also has to find the funds for infrastructure such as water tanks, etc., whether from grants, fundraising events or donations.
    • Pestasides almost 9 years ago
      I've visited several local community Garden's and Co-operative Gardens (Non-Council land), and have yet to see a solar panel pumping water to the garden. What a great idea...
    • Deonast almost 9 years ago
      'No Dogs' has it occurred to you that the phrase 'Solar Access" just means how much sun light gets to the land (eg shaded or sunny patch). Solar does not mean solar panels, they would have said solar panels if they meant that. If you would like a definition of solar try http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/solar which shows it is an adjective for Sun. Or try http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun.I know you seem to hate with a passion the idea of community gardens but please read carefully before bashing the BMCC, they have enough troubles as it is.I'm sure the BMCC plan to get the community involved, it stands to reason you can't have a community garden without a community to help out. Why do you think they have this site up here, allowing you to chime in with your 2 cents.
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      • whynot almost 9 years ago
        Hear hear Deonast! In fact a community garden cannot be created without the community FIRST coming together and PROPOSING that they want to start one. This whole forum is about presenting the guidlines on how to go about doing just that.
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        • Maryanne Bell almost 9 years ago
          Dear Celeste,The Mid Mountains Community Garden with the invaluable assistance of Louise Sutcliffe and the Mid Mountains Neighbourhood Centre began a comprehensive search for a site for a community garden before being invited to use land by Gwen and Peter Adkins, managers of Kihilla owned by The Church Army. The minutes of these initial "whole group" monthly meetings will show that many local residents were committed and voted in favour of a shared garden approach with produce shared among the members and with provisions for surplus in the future to be made available to disadvantaged members of the local community.The Mid Mountains Community Garden (MMCG) has a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with The Church Army that is very generous and is in effect a 3 year lease agreement. No money is expected by "the landlords" but the MOU does say that the MMCG would work to first provide its own water (now accomplished with a 10,000 litre water tank) and that any surplus would be given to the managers of Kihilla to feed the many people who attend their charitable residential courses.This forum has asked for comments and I have supplied my experiences. It is unfortunate that a few individuals are using this forum to express their discontent with the politics of the BMCC. I suggest they direct their concerns in writing to the Manager of the BMCC and/or attending council meetings. Sometimes we forget that the BMCC is our local government. Lastly, respectful active listening and dialogue are tools of a civilised society that we must always aspire to especially in times of economic hardships: care for people, care for the earth and share the surplus.Loving kindnessMaryanneHazelbrook.
  • NKresident almost 9 years ago
    Back to the topic: the basic requirements - apart from the obvious physical aspects of the site - are a keen group of a people with the time, commitment and skills to do all the hard work of establishing a community garden. Those skills are more than just gardening skills - they also need to know how to engage the local community and be willing to learn from the successes & failures of similar community gardens elsewhere. They need to be more than just enthusiastic - and be realistic about what can be achieved. Ideally, the garden should be located to provide easy access without the need for a car. It should also be accessible to groups that could benefit from having a garden nearby, e.g. schools (for its educational benefits) or retirement villages (for its health/social benefits).
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    • Deonast almost 9 years ago
      Couldn't agree more, all valid points. It would be pointless establishing a community garden where significant numbers of the community couldn't get involved due to location and transport. I also like your idea about getting schools involved, good way of maintaining a critical mass.
  • Maryanne Bell almost 9 years ago
    I have commented on the basic requirements in the other areas of discussion but to briefly summarise: good will, respectful active listening and dialogue with agreed Charter documents that include a Gardener's Guide.Loving kindnessMaryanneHazelbrook.
  • Maryanne Bell almost 9 years ago
    I have posted this as a reply but feel it may become lost so here it is as a comment for the survey.The Mid Mountains Community Garden with the invaluable assistance of Louise Sutcliffe and the Mid Mountains Neighbourhood Centre began a comprehensive search for a site for a community garden before being invited to use land by Gwen and Peter Adkins, managers of Kihilla owned by The Church Army.The minutes of these initial "whole group" monthly meetings will show that many local residents were committed and voted in favour of a shared garden approach with produce shared among the members and with provisions for surplus in the future to be made available to disadvantaged members of the local community.The Mid Mountains Community Garden (MMCG) has a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with The Church Army that is very generous and is in effect a 3 year lease agreement. No money is expected by "the landlords" but the MOU does say that the MMCG would work to first provide its own water (now accomplished with a 10,000 litre water tank) and that any surplus would be given to the managers of Kihilla to feed the many people who attend their charitable residential courses.This forum has asked for comments and I have supplied my experiences. It is unfortunate that a few individuals are using this forum to express their discontent with the politics of the BMCC. I suggest they direct their concerns in writing to the Manager of the BMCC and/or attending council meetings. Sometimes we forget that the BMCC is our local government.Lastly, respectful active listening and dialogue are tools of a civilised society that we must always aspire to especially in times of economic hardships: care for people, care for the earth and share the surplus.Loving kindnessMaryanneHazelbrook.
  • erland almost 9 years ago
    I would also like to see the barriers to entry for starting a community garden lowered as much as possible. No one wants to see failed projects but with more support for starting up gardens from council staff and removing as much red tape from the process for applying and managing a community garden, we can encourage a better uptake and a stronger, healthier and more sustainable community generally.