The establishment of a community garden has a range of considerations; what do you consider important?

about 6 years ago
CLOSED: This map consultation has concluded

The draft Application Form is included in the Guidelines as an Appendix. When making an application to establish a community garden, the information required includes a detailed description of the site. Understanding the site well, including its advantages and limitations, will increase the likely success of a community garden project. An application that has a sound understanding of the site and the impact of the intended use, will be more likely to be approved.

Other important considerations relate to the group that will manage the garden. Has the group formalised their aims and objectives? Do they know how decisions will be made and resolve any conflicts? How will new members be recruited? Will fund-raising be required and if so, how? It may be helpful to identify the skills available and those required by the proposed community garden group.

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  • The Deacon over 9 years ago
    A done deal it is stated above "will be more likely to be approved" why hold this waste of time forum? what a rought!! BMCC you are a bad in debt joke that just continue to use issues like this to mask their total inability to get out of debt and run an efficient business like council for the people and in their best interest. SHAME BMCC SHAME !!!
    Hide Replies (3)
    • DOG GONE over 9 years ago
      I read the same thing no dogs it dones appear to be a done deal, BMCC are you that corupt that you cant even run a discussion on a community garden honestly U R a Disgrace BMCC just a Disgrace. MY god I pitty you BMCC.
    • Deonast over 9 years ago
      If you are really worried about debts and financial dealings. Complain about the fact that the council owns the land the Blue Mountains City Church in Mount Riverview use and charges them the rental and rates of $1a year. Going from that example there should be other land that can be examined in this manner. I can't see how the use of a community garden on land which may be under utilised (which they obviously want community groups to contribute to financially) could be a worse idea. At least it isn't tailored to one particular religious group.
    • Maryanne Bell over 9 years ago
      Dear (real name?) Respectful listening and dialogue is important. I thank the BMCC for asking our opinions about this important topic. I believe food security will become increasingly more paramount as the extreme weather events increase in frequency. Permaculture Blue Mountains will be holding a Sustainability Talk on the 22 February 2011 where Pat Rayner a founding member of the Sydney Food Fairness Alliance will speak about Food Security. I encourage you to attend. http://www.wiserearth.org/event/view/de3eee4cfa808692579d792611c6b577 Address: 2 Loftus St Lawson Bowling Club Lawson 2783 Australia Loving kindness Maryanne Hazelbrook.
  • Two Dogs over 9 years ago
    Important Huuum? have a labotimy that would help. community garden what a waste of time how long will this brain wave last ? weed garden waiting to happen!
  • hate u over 9 years ago
    It is important not to take public land for the few to use. It would be important not to take areas of native bush land. It is most important not to effect local children by taking their play areas. It is very important that all funds be supplied by interested parties and not the council (self funded) the community is not paying to feed the few. Who will be paying to supply water to the site plus on going water bills? not council I hope!
    Hide Replies (6)
    • Redacted user over 9 years ago
      Community land is often provided for the use of a small number of people - think of a cricket ground, a big space to entertain just 22 people and Council pays for the maintenance and improvement of such a facility. The new cricket pitch at Knapsack will cost $11000. The Community Gardeners will have to provide the funds for their projects themselves. So calm down Hate u and get a nicer name.
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      • whynot over 9 years ago
        G wingett, too true. Nicely said. Gardens are great places for children to learn about how plants grow and how to grow plants.
      • hate u over 9 years ago
        you end your response "So calm down Hate u and get a nicer name" why does it bother U? I have my say U have your say I have leveled no abuse at U so U calm down & dont BULLY people for having a say. YES I oppose this topic & I have the right to as do U have the right to oppose.
        Hide reply (1)
        • satanic over 9 years ago
          Well put Mr hate U, BRAVO !! I did agree with community gardens but after reading so many mean attacking responses I now can not agree this forum as it has become an easy place to attack others from behind a key board, My name is GORDON MILLAR for any one that needs to know. Good luck to you all and maybe a face to face meeting may prove more productive if the council were to agree to one.
    • Deonast over 9 years ago
      Or as I mentioned earlier council owns the land that the Blue Mountains City Church in Mount Riverview has use of for just $1 a year. So if your arguments are on use of land by just a few don't forget about these other properties. Perhaps in the interest of of public disclosure the council could make a list of properties it owns, the purpose they are used for and the revenues or costs associated with their use. That would be an interesting read. I do in principle like the idea of public gardens though. It encourages community spirit, produces some food and hopefully makes use of land in a productive manner.
    • Maryanne Bell over 9 years ago
      Dear BM resident (real name?) At the Mid Mountains Community Garden on private land we used the owners' water sparingly for only a few small beds and now we have a water tank that is collecting and providing 10,000 litres. I encourage you to visit some community gardens in the Blue Mountains and talk to the members. Loving kindness Maryanne
  • whynot over 9 years ago
    There needs to be a certain number of people in the community who will commit to the garden happening, turn up and be prepared to work through the issues that will be raised. I dont know what that number maybe 10 or so. The biggest issues to deal with will be social conflict, people learning how to get on with one another, how to make decisions, and how not to exclude anyone from the community. So some thinking on how this will occur in the community would help.
    Hide reply (1)
    • Maryanne Bell over 9 years ago
      Dear Celeste, I think the Carss Park Community Garden Gardener's Guide (http://communitygarden.org.au/) covers these vital consideration. Last year when the Mid Mountains Community Garden encountered the expected conflicts, Gwen and Peter Adkins, managers of the property (owned by The Church Army) provided us with a conflict resolution workshop that was very valuable. However, all active and vocal members must be willing to participate. Unfortunately on that occasion a few were unable to attend. I learned that conflict should not be shunned or avoided; it is a part of life and that respectful listening and dialogue is something we can all learn if we are willing to focus on the goal and the conflict and not the individual. I am an eternal optimist and try to practise these ethics. (See Gardener's Guide) Loving kindness Maryanne.
  • Maryanne Bell over 9 years ago
    I encourage BMCC to actively establish community gardens on council land or on private land. I have learnt that some members within the community garden where members have voted to create "shared gardens" are really wanting to create "alotments" or a "market garden". This results in many disappointed members who walk away. To avoid this I suggest the following 2 comments: 1. I think it is paramount that aims, objectives, principles and a code of conduct in the form of a Charter are established as quickly as possible. Many community gardens are successful when they have a strong Managment Committee. If conflicts arise there must be a mechanism enshrined in the Charter documents. In this way the organisation will survive. I suggest the model of Carss Park Community Garden. Although I haven't visited this community garden http://www.kogarah.nsw.gov.au/www/html/2478-carss-park-community-garden.asp. I know that Russ Grayson from Australian City Farms and Community Garden Network http://communitygarden.org.au/ was instrumental in its establishment. 2. If the community garden is to begin as a "shared garden" it must make every effort to encourage members to attend to garden and harvest together in a convivial atmosphere. Garden design and the building of structures must take priority and be carried out by a team of skilled workers. I would like to see individuals pledge amounts of money to purchase materials and engage professionals. But better still would be active assistance from BMCC. Milson Point Community Garden was established in 6 months with council assistance. Visit http://mosman-daily.whereilive.com.au/news/story/planting-the-seeds-of-a-fruitful-society/. Loving kindness Maryanne Hazelbrook.
  • Pestasides over 9 years ago
    Anyone who has tried to set up a Community Garden on BMCC Public land will know that sensitive environmental areas are not up for grabs. Personally I think the following are necessary...I will undoubtedly think of more Easy pedestrian access to the site from town centre. A toilet, shed or building to keep tools etc Easy pedestrian access around the site (wheelchair to most areas). Easy access to water, tank where possible. Organic inputs. Recycled inputs. Sign in book for those working on site (OH&S). If shared Garden: Information board to relay information and maintenance requirements. Recognized code for maintenance requirements ie bed empty, or bed planted with seeds leave alone. I think an allotment system would have a greater advantage, but these would have an other whole set of rules
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    • Maryanne Bell over 9 years ago
      Dear Sue, Yes, I agree with the above and point everyone to the wonderful Carss Park Community Garden Gardener's Guide... developed with input from Russ Grayson (links provided in my earlier comments). From my experiences with the Mid Mountains Community Garden these elements are paramount: 1. the establishment of Charter documents; 2. a site analysis and then a good garden design - Arthur and Rosemary Lathouris were invited and provided free valuable surveying and then maps. Greg and I helped them and I found it fascinating and it showed how imperative this is for our mountainous sites with water runoff an important environmental consideration; 3. that the garden design create paths and garden beds that are sustainable, maximise the planting space... Milson Point Community Garden has some interesting beds that were designed and constructed before any planting commenced; 4. a good communication system for all members; 5. a space for educational activities - at MMCG the owners have provided facilities and Sue is about to teach the second gardening course through TAFENSW Outreach & Blue Moutains College. Loving kindness Maryanne
  • erland over 9 years ago
    I would also like to see the barriers to entry for starting a community garden lowered as much as possible. No one wants to see failed projects but with more support for starting up gardens from council staff and removing as much red tape from the process for applying and managing a community garden, we can encourage a better uptake and a stronger, healthier and more sustainable community generally.
  • LeanneS over 9 years ago
    Apart from what has already been said, I believe an important consideration is member access to the garden. Unfortunately the MMCG can only be accessed of a weekend which for some people who are busy with children, sports or other activities on the weekend make it very hard to attend to contribute. Having the garden available to attend during the week will also encourage school groups and the very large BM homeschooling community to take part and learn from the values instilled in community gardening. I think this needs to be considered greatly when choosing council land and deciding on any policies.
  • whynot about 9 years ago
    I think the application could include a place where the propsed group provides a summary of how it intends to manage the community, its ethos/vision/charter of operation and what methods it plans to use to resovle conflict and difficulty. The Council document could provide a proforma that could be used if a group does not have views on these to start with, eg some examples that already are used in other gardens, Carss Park model, many of the City of Sydney gardens We often start community ventures assuming that we will all get on. Doesn't happen in families why should it happen in other groups? A sound proposal on how the conflicts will be managed is needed